Mosquito Resistant Hammock & apparel

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TXyakr
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Mosquito Resistant Hammock & apparel

#1

Post by TXyakr » Mon Nov 02, 2015 8:11 am

Permethrin repellent for mosquitos, ticks, lice etc.

Many years ago a childhood friend of mine from South America got lyme disease from tick(s) while hiking in N.A. Ironically he had grown up in Brazil, worked for decades in remote parts of war torn East Africa and now lives mostly in South Africa. In North America there are several mosquito borne diseases (not native) including West Nile, Chikungunya, Encephalitis, and Dengue in south Florida, but the most danger is from an auto accident on your way to/from a camping location so prepare for tiny critters, but don't worry excessively about them. One of several ways to protect yourself is to spray or drench shoes, clothes, hats, folding chairs, hammocks etc. with “Permethrin” then let it dry so it bonds to the fabric. The spray is toxic to the skin of humans and cats when wet, but not when dry and bonded. Some apparel sold in stores for outdoor adventures come with permethrin bonded to the fabric already, it lasts for multiple washings. A very few people may be allergic to permethrin, so test out a small amount first, spray on a sock or something and wear it for a few hours when you are in the city with access to an ER, antihistamine etc. (same as peanuts, wheat, latex, dairy and everything else). Some plants have the natural alternative, pyrethrum, which is similar and was used thousands of years ago by Persians. I also spray 100% DEET just on my boots, but NOT SKIN! (27% or less on skin). Permethrin is sold as a spray for lice, also Sawyer brand for apparel and tents (I use on my hammock and bug-net), but I prefer to buy 10-40% concentrate and dilute to 0.5%, the brand I am using now is Martins (a Texas brand), but there are many others that are good. Drench/soaking in bucket is a good method, then take waste to toxic waste disposal or flush down toilet (or spray in attic), but it is VERY bad for aquatic life in streams/lakes so do not throw out in ditch or yard. That is my opinion, I arrived at it after reading peer reviewed and vetted university based research not self-published nonsense by someone's crazy cat lady aunt who takes excessive herbs and pharmaceuticals. Junk science TICKS me off, pun intended. BTW Martins is not labeled to be used on human apparel so you are on your own with that and in violation of Federal Law, but IMO same basic chemical as Sawyer which is labeled for use on human apparel but requires that the user do math and mix it with water correctly. I.e. don’t be stupid! So if you have a bad reaction (perhaps less than 1 in 100,000 but I don’t know) or did not dilute it properly you cannot sue Martins or one of the other manufactures because it was only labeled for use on certain animals and not humans. If you use the pre-diluted Sawyers and something bad happens you probably would not be successful in suing them either because they would claim you did not follow all the instructions either. So just use common sense, regardless of what product you use all natural or synthetic or even just netting and untreated apparel, avoid getting burned to death around fires with bug netting etc. Avoid trees falling on your tent or hammock, drunken ATVs driving over you at night, river rising due to rain upriver, just a few hazards I have encountered. Common sense!

Martins and others sold at Farm and Feed stores must be diluted but may be one of the the cheapest ways to go, however it requires basic math skills.
http://www.martinsbrand.com/products/29/

Sawyer is a ready to use spray product but more expensive than what you can mix/dilute yourself. It is available at Walmart (ship to store) or most camping supply stores and is typically much cheaper than lice “ready to use” sprays for Fabric NOT for hair (brands like Nix, RID, LiceMD, Lice-B-Gone) these are all basically the 0.5% permethrin, read the label:
https://sawyer.com/products/permethrin- ... repellent/

NEVER PUT PERMETHRIN ON YOUR HAIR!!! Only on fabric, then allow it to dry!


http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/Permtech.pdf

Even the Academy brand outdoor fishing clothes Magellan has MagProtect(TM), ExOfficio has BugsAway® apparel with Insect Shield® technology, Columbia has Insect Blocker(TM) and a video on YouTube:

Columbia® Men's Insect Blocker™
https://youtu.be/oUyraznj1E8

But for fairly cheap you can make your own as thousands of outdoor people have been doing for many years. About $20 for pint or quart of concentrate will treat a bunch of stuff for years. However, my experience is that during the summer when I use just a very thin layer of ripstop nylon hammock between me and the mosquitos their buzzing is still very loud but they don't land on it or suck blood through it. But the permethrin's smell is not nearly as offensive as that of "DEET" to have my face so close to. A layer of permethrin soaked bug netting below the hammock might create some space and reduce the noise some, or foam ear-plugs. Citronella candles don't seem to work very well, don't last all night.

There are several natural mosquito repellents available in the Amazon and other jungles and temperate forests, most are plants, also some insects and clays. Their advantage is that it is one less thing to carry assuming they are effective for you. Here is one type of ant nest commonly found growing in trees, the sting is not very painful, mostly just a tickle as they run all over you and the smell (oil?) they leave behind as you crush them on you is somewhat effective against mosquitos. See YouTube video:

https://youtu.be/u4T7RDuGLbM

Also search for Cymbopogon nardus (Citronella grass) and Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass) and many other species. Some Citronella variations of geranium: Pelargonium 'citrosum' is hardy to USDA Zone 10-11. Many other herbs are somewhat effective, anything in the mint/sage family has may work a little, so feel the stem. Is it square? If so it is probably in this family. Leaves of American Beauty Berry bush and many others are better than nothing, but always make sure you do not have an allergic reaction to any plant you have never used on your skin before. I have a longer write up on mosquito repellent plants but in general they are not as effective, i.e. last resort. (OR very, very last resort...)

Here is a partial list:
http://bestplants.com/plants-that-repel-mosquitoes/



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TXyakr
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Re: Mosquito Resistant Hammock & apparel

#2

Post by TXyakr » Mon Nov 02, 2015 8:28 am

In recent years an alarming number of common head lice have mutated (or new generations have developed) that are resistant to permethrin treatments for apparel and bedding once widely used to help control them so they are becoming almost an epidemic. Best not to hold your head to close to some young kid or teen or anyone very long for a social media "selfie", personally I am a bit paranoid and don't let my beard touch anyone or any "public" fabric, and keep my head hair trimmed very short. But that is probably an over reaction. ha ha ha

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and- ... -25-states

Bottom line I hope mosquitos and ticks don't become resistant to permethrin and DEET!

I don't care if you call that evolution or just natural selection of mutated genes adapting to human modification of the environment or whatever. But we need to stay one step ahead of it. ;-)
Long sleeve shirts, pants, boots, hats, bug-nets go a long ways in helping, common sense. Also a great mountain man beard if you are a man, or woman and not embarrassed about it... ha ha ha...

Edit: Keeping all your head hair, especially beard coated (lightly) in oil both carrier and essential helps control both lice and mosquitos. I use sweet almond oil and peppermint oil mix the most (DIY). Coconut oil, olive oil as carrier are also good, and dozens of essential oils are great: Sandalwood is expensive but great, cedar wood, citrus (various), just ask at your local store that carries them or at forums that discuss this. Bees wax mixed with Shea butter for mustache with a bit of essential oil. All these are great for helping to start a fire also a hazard if you get to close to one. ha ha ha. Don't over use like Michael Jackson!

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