Underquilts Explained

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sarge
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Underquilts Explained

#1

Post by sarge » Thu Apr 07, 2016 7:51 am

Next to the hammock itself, insulation---particulary under you, is the most important compenent of a hammock shelter system

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_boMFBodU5g


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Re: Underquilts Explained

#2

Post by TXyakr » Fri Apr 22, 2016 6:08 am

I agree that UQs have many more advantages than pads in a hammock but there are a few situations were a common ground pad may be a better choice.
Some UQ advantages: typically warmer per weight and space, doesn't move around as much, keeps shoulders warmer unless very wide (heavy) or you sew on shoulder pad sides into a pad cover (lot of effort).

Some pad advantages: biggest for me is when I'm not camping in a forest or someplace with posts/trees or where I can haul a hammock stand to, therefore must sleep on the ground with just the tarp over me (possibly use hammock as bivy/bug net or for wind-block.) An UQ gets the insulating air compressed out of it when not suspended and you lie directly on it so isn't effective on the ground. Places I take a ground pad instead or as well include: sand or gravel beaches and islands of rivers, lakes and especially the ocean, i.e. the only public land I am legally allowed to camp on for many of my trips each year. Also in some weatern deserts, especially high altitude deserts. Above the tree line of many mountains (i.e. no more forest and hanging from a rock cliff can be dangerous if a critter or person dislodges some larger stones on your head.) Also several times a year I travel more than one day's journey to get to a really special camping location or to visit friends and against my preference my car pooling friends want to spend the night at a motel with only double beds. I strongly prefer to sleep on a pad on the floor of the motel room than share a bed with a dude or some woman other than my wife (she gets jealous and will eventually find out, ;-) ). Also when visiting some friends they don't have enough beds for us all to sleep, or anywhere to hang and frown on me sleeping under a local overpass with the local homeless population, ha ha ha. I have nothing against homeless folks but a few of them are even more mentality disturbed than me, and show a lot of curiosity about a hammock ;-)

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Calait
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Re: Underquilts Explained

#3

Post by Calait » Fri Apr 22, 2016 9:22 pm

Thanks for the Underquilt explanation, while I am attempting to gain more information, I know living in the Central Texas area I will need underquilts to cover temperatures from 90 to 25 F. and not one will work. Thinking of doing one for 70, another for 50, another for 40, and finally one for 20. Where is the best place to research the material needed, I have been looking at Dutch's DIY site as well as ripstop by the roll. Thanks
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Re: Underquilts Explained

#4

Post by sarge » Fri Apr 22, 2016 10:00 pm

Both of those will help. Backpacking Light, Thru Hiker, Andrew Skurka's book Ultimate Hiker's Gear Guide. See if you can find Ray Jardine's book. Ultimate Hang, http://www.tothewoods.net/ . See if you can find Ed Speer's book.

Remember that quilts were originally designed as an Ultralight replacement for sleeping bags (that's why you read Jardine), so there's lots of research potential for insulation and techniques in the ground dweller sites like BPL. The info Skurka gives in his book is helpful there.

The thing is, there's no one place to get all the info. You've got to dig a bunch yourself.


Down is lighter and less bulky, but more expensive and harder to work with. Synthetics are cheaper and easier to work with, but bulkier---at the lower temps especially so. IMO synthetics are the better choice, especially for Texas, between 40 and 70 degrees.

I'd recommend two quilts. One for 40-70 and another for 2-40. Go synthetic for the firts on---5.0 Climashield will get you to 30; 2.5 will get you to 40. If you go with 5.0 Climashield and use it for your 40 degree quilt, you've got a fudge factor if it gets colder than the forecast. The down side is its a bit bulkier than some folks like it to be. IIRC, RBTR sells 3.6 which would be a good compromise, and likely have a safety factor to 30 if you wear the right clothes. For MYOG, Climashield is easier to work with than anything else, and there are come good patterns out there.

Go with down for the cold weather quilt for both weight and bulk.
You can resolve to live your life with integrity. Let your credo be this: Let the lie come into the world, let it even triumph. But not through me. ― Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
My You Tube Channel

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Calait
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Re: Underquilts Explained

#5

Post by Calait » Sun Apr 24, 2016 7:57 pm

sarge wrote:Both of those will help. Backpacking Light, Thru Hiker, Andrew Skurka's book Ultimate Hiker's Gear Guide. See if you can find Ray Jardine's book. Ultimate Hang, http://www.tothewoods.net/ . See if you can find Ed Speer's book.

Remember that quilts were originally designed as an Ultralight replacement for sleeping bags (that's why you read Jardine), so there's lots of research potential for insulation and techniques in the ground dweller sites like BPL. The info Skurka gives in his book is helpful there.

The thing is, there's no one place to get all the info. You've got to dig a bunch yourself.


Down is lighter and less bulky, but more expensive and harder to work with. Synthetics are cheaper and easier to work with, but bulkier---at the lower temps especially so. IMO synthetics are the better choice, especially for Texas, between 40 and 70 degrees.

I'd recommend two quilts. One for 40-70 and another for 2-40. Go synthetic for the firts on---5.0 Climashield will get you to 30; 2.5 will get you to 40. If you go with 5.0 Climashield and use it for your 40 degree quilt, you've got a fudge factor if it gets colder than the forecast. The down side is its a bit bulkier than some folks like it to be. IIRC, RBTR sells 3.6 which would be a good compromise, and likely have a safety factor to 30 if you wear the right clothes. For MYOG, Climashield is easier to work with than anything else, and there are come good patterns out there.

Go with down for the cold weather quilt for both weight and bulk.
Thanks Sarge, there is a lot of reading and researching to wade through, to include Dutch and his new additions. Your information assist tons. :D
Any day in the outdoors is better than a day at work.

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Re: Underquilts Explained

#6

Post by sarge » Sun Apr 24, 2016 9:20 pm

No problem. The internet is your freind, really.

Here's another great resource, but start on page 7 with the first issue and work your way forward. You'll see why I say that I can remember a time when this magazine was actually about backpacking and not just shilling for its advertisers:

https://books.google.com/books/serial/I ... =N&start=0
You can resolve to live your life with integrity. Let your credo be this: Let the lie come into the world, let it even triumph. But not through me. ― Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
My You Tube Channel

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