Best Under Insulation For a Noob

A place for new hammock users to get resources to help
Post Reply
User avatar
sarge
Reactions:
Posts: 2067
Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2015 10:14 am
Location: Houston, TX
Hammock:
Tarp:
Suspension:
Insulation:
Contact:

Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#1

Post by sarge » Fri Aug 28, 2015 3:19 pm

The title says it all.

Tell us why.


You can resolve to live your life with integrity. Let your credo be this: Let the lie come into the world, let it even triumph. But not through me. ― Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
My You Tube Channel

User avatar
Baby Huey
Reactions:
Posts: 297
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 10:57 pm
Location: Houston, TX
Hammock:
Tarp:
Suspension:
Insulation:

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#2

Post by Baby Huey » Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:31 pm

I would say a pad of the inflatable or non inflatable type with a good R- Value. It makes sense to start with something that will also work on the ground if you decide that hanging is not for you.
"Y'all got on this boat for different reasons, but y'all come to the same place."
-Capt. Malcolm Reynolds-

User avatar
Scuba
Site Admin
Reactions:
Posts: 871
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 10:02 pm
Location: San Antonio
Hammock: DreamHammock
Tarp: UGQ WD or Hanger
Suspension: Varies
Insulation: UGQ40 HG20

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#3

Post by Scuba » Fri Aug 28, 2015 6:31 pm

AHE Jarbridge when they are on sale.
"I come in peace. I didn't bring artillery. But I'm pleading with you, with tears in my eyes: If you fuck with me, I'll kill you all." - Gen James Mattis, USMC RET.
Owner/Administrator HammockHangers.net

User avatar
V_Allen
Reactions:
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2015 10:34 am
Location: Wyoming
Hammock:
Tarp:
Suspension:
Insulation:

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#4

Post by V_Allen » Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:05 am

I started with a foam pad and once I found down/synthetic uq's, I've never looked at another pad. Short of it is a pad (wide enough and long enough), is a good way to find out if you like hammocking. I've seen many people give up after a frustrating night in cold weather. I always recommend finding another hanger in your area and ask for a demo. Even just dropping by a group hang will get you a bunch of friendly people showing you their rigs and letting you try them out and explaining how things are done.

While I tell people to go to a forum, I also tell them that a noob will be overwhelmed with all the different types of gear and opinions (which there are many).

Wally world pads are cheap and work surprisingly well if set-up correctly.
V_Allens Bridges For Bigger People v_allen@mail.com

HammockMama
Reactions:
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2015 4:53 am
Hammock:
Tarp:
Suspension:
Insulation:

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#5

Post by HammockMama » Mon Sep 21, 2015 6:46 am

Well, after hanging for about 15 years, I still don't own an underquilt. Not that I hang outside in winter that much, but I have done so. Between age and getting a Select Comfort "Dial a Mattress," it is really hard to want to even test cold weather options in New England...

That said, I have a few tests for what goes into my pack, starting with is it multi-use. Underquilts don't work well on the ground, while pads do. I could make a quilt that could be worn as a tunic, and may do so eventually. Meanwhile, I have used assorted pads and a fleece tunic that can also be slung under the hammock as a blanket. Nearly always I keep a space blanket slung under my hammock for wind and spray protection as well as some reflected warmth. Coupled with the fleece slung below or my Gossamer Gear Thinlight pad, I am comfortable to around 50 F, maybe lower. I really should check out temps with this set up again to see how low it goes for me. The foam can sit right on the space blanket and is used as a back pad in my Mariposa or for rest stops as a ground pad. The fleece tunic doesn't always make the trip, but works as a blanket, coat, poncho liner, and, of course, tunic. It has separate sleeves that I can use with or without the tunic, in the hammock with the blanket below (covers my arms which would otherwise be cold from the hammock sides), or even be used as a head wrap. Before quilts came out, I often used a 3/4 Prolite inflatable mattress for insulation, with my nearly empty pack under my feet and legs and a few items like a towel or poncho to keep my arms from directly touching the hammock sides.

A noob might want to hook up with an experienced hangar, as stated previously. If that hangar has a spare set up and time to take him/her out, so much the better. My experience is no one system is the only one to work.

User avatar
BillyBob66
Reactions:
Posts: 729
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2015 10:43 am
Location: Tupelo, MS
Hammock: Claytor/JRB/HH/SB
Tarp: JRB 11X10
Suspension: CinchBuckle/WS/TriG
Insulation: HHSS,P.Pod,MWUQ,Yeti

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#6

Post by BillyBob66 » Mon Sep 21, 2015 8:54 pm

HammockMama wrote:Well, after hanging for about 15 years, I still don't own an underquilt. Not that I hang outside in winter that much, but I have done so. Between age and getting a Select Comfort "Dial a Mattress," it is really hard to want to even test cold weather options in New England...

That said, I have a few tests for what goes into my pack, starting with is it multi-use. Underquilts don't work well on the ground, while pads do. I could make a quilt that could be worn as a tunic, and may do so eventually. Meanwhile, I have used assorted pads and a fleece tunic that can also be slung under the hammock as a blanket. Nearly always I keep a space blanket slung under my hammock for wind and spray protection as well as some reflected warmth. Coupled with the fleece slung below or my Gossamer Gear Thinlight pad, I am comfortable to around 50 F, maybe lower. I really should check out temps with this set up again to see how low it goes for me. The foam can sit right on the space blanket and is used as a back pad in my Mariposa or for rest stops as a ground pad. The fleece tunic doesn't always make the trip, but works as a blanket, coat, poncho liner, and, of course, tunic. It has separate sleeves that I can use with or without the tunic, in the hammock with the blanket below (covers my arms which would otherwise be cold from the hammock sides), or even be used as a head wrap. Before quilts came out, I often used a 3/4 Prolite inflatable mattress for insulation, with my nearly empty pack under my feet and legs and a few items like a towel or poncho to keep my arms from directly touching the hammock sides.

A noob might want to hook up with an experienced hangar, as stated previously. If that hangar has a spare set up and time to take him/her out, so much the better. My experience is no one system is the only one to work.
Wow, hanging for 15 years and still never got an UQ? Impressive!

When recommending what folks maybe should start with, the pads do have some major pluses. It might be more likely that a noob ether can't get their hang right for comfort, or can't get their UQ adjusted right, and end up on the ground for survival. (happened to me on my first night in a hammock at 22F, many miles from my car. Thank goodness I had brought a pad just because I was worried about such. I was not planning on using the pad in the hammock, I had an HHSS for that. The pad was brought just because I was totally inexperienced with hammocks and did not know if it would work out, plus some nights might be above tree line. Counting the first night and the one night above tree line, I ended up using that pad twice on that week long trip. Sure was glad I had it.

OTOH, that was 2006 and I have never had to use a pad since, though I have used them voluntarily a few times just for experimentation. I sometimes wish I had spent as much time experimenting with- and maybe increasing my skills with- pads as I have with HHSSs, PeaPods and UQs. Because I have always said that the folks who prefer or at least are just fine with pads are the lucky ones. Way less expense, hard to do it wrong, water and wind proof(at least compared to UQs) and all set for the ground if something goes all wrong.

I'm really surprised I did not look into pads more considering one of my early experiments with a Speer hammock, a Speer SPE with 1 torso length summer/fall pad(Thermarest ultralight 1" self inflating) stacked on top of 1 full length fall/summer pad(TR Ridgerest), both pads over 20 years old. It was 18F, and that was probably my 1st ever totally warm night in a hammock: toasty. Could have definitely gone a good bit lower than 18F. Plus, I do not recall it being an uncomfortable night. Can not say for certain that it was as comfy as a hammock with no pad, but it was still more comfy than a pad on the ground, and plenty comfy.

But, when I have used either CCF or inflatable pads in my JRB bridge hammock, it has always been plenty comfy and easy to use. So if the noob in question uses a double layer bridge, I would definitely recommend a pad to start with.

In fact, most of my pad use has been with a JRB BMBH and a torso size piece of cut off WM blue pad. Down south summer and early fall I am usually not going to bother with any UQ. On most of those nights where I don't need anything, but maybe notice a cold back about 4 or 5AM. Then I just get up to pee, slide the torso pad into the bridge's pad pocket, and toasty until time to get up. Using that pad that way, I really can't ever tell it is there, except for the warmth.
Rom8:21the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption23..but..we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit.. groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body

HammockMama
Reactions:
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2015 4:53 am
Hammock:
Tarp:
Suspension:
Insulation:

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#7

Post by HammockMama » Wed Sep 23, 2015 6:45 pm

CBS is one reason I keep the space blanket suspended under my hammock. It weighs next to nothing, blocks wind and spray as noted earlier, can be a ground sheet if I deploy the hammock as a bivy (never yet). It fits inside my Snakeskins, so is simple to leave on pack and unpack, etc. Some people have complained about getting wet in a Hennessy with a stock fly. I've been out in tropical storms (downgraded from hurricanes) and stayed dry with the stock fly and the mylar "storm shield." It is also very easy to plop my GG Thinlight right onto the space blanket for some insulation. Rarely have I needed more than this combination in the summer, even on some mountain trail.

User avatar
SGT Rock
Reactions:
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Sep 23, 2015 12:20 pm
Hammock:
Tarp:
Suspension:
Insulation:

Re: Best Under Insulation For a Noob

#8

Post by SGT Rock » Thu Sep 24, 2015 6:24 am

After 15 years I still love pads. I consider an underquilt a supplement to my pads, not the other way around.
No Sniveling!

Post Reply

Return to “New Hanger Central”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests