Sven Saw

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Sven Saw

#1

Post by flashcb » Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:37 pm

Anybody use one? I am not a backpacker at all, but trying to lean that way. When Car Glamping I use my bow saw quite a bit if in a place cutting limbs and such are allowed. Is it worth trying to carry one for packing?


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Re: Sven Saw

#2

Post by sarge » Fri Sep 04, 2015 8:19 pm

This is gonna be a personal preference thing; so here goes mine:

As far as backpacking goes, there are two old syaings: "Pounds equal pain, ounces equal pounds" and "We pack our fears".

I can tell you that in 55 years of backpacking and camping, I've never had a legitimate use for saws, axes, hatchets, or any other cutting tool larger than a good hunting knife. You can build a decent fire with dry wood an inch to an inch and a half thick that you can break over your knee and will burn long enough for you to cook on and do some gazing into the embers---or if you've gathered enough, long enough for you and your buddies to solve all of the world's problems while sitting around it.

The problem down here in Texas is that you can't count on the ability to use a campfire for cooking, or anything else for that matter, because some counties will put up a burn ban at the drop of a hat. So you're better off just planning as if a burn ban will always be in effect and use a stove for cooking and some other form of illumination for "campfire fellowship". I've spent more than one pleasant evening with friends sitting around an UCO candle instead of a campfire.

You shouldn't need any tools for cutting wood to make a shelter, or for any othe "survival" or "bushcraft" type of thing because, if you're packed right, your pack IS your Survival Kit---and a decent Survival Kit allows you to cook or set up shelter if you're injured or non-ambulatory. The best planning for a Survival situation, IMO, is to have essential items that don't require you moving more than a few feet from your pack to use effectively.
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Re: Sven Saw

#3

Post by Scuba » Fri Sep 04, 2015 8:51 pm

I regularly carry my 7 oz Bahco Laplander.
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Re: Sven Saw

#4

Post by Baby Huey » Sat Sep 05, 2015 12:08 am

I carry a Silky Saw Accel 2 but any good folding saw is good for this type of concern. I was interested in the Sven Saw, but decided to go with a folding saw for ease of setup and use.
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Re: Sven Saw

#5

Post by DuxDawg » Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:47 am

Up here we use saws all the time. Yup, made many a fire, indeed most of them, by breaking wood without using any tools. For clearing roads or trails of fallen timber, hammock sites of underbrush, crafts and projects, etc saws sure come in handy. When clearing sites of underbrush, knives and machetes leave lil pungi sticks for dogs and people to step on. Saws leave nice smooth flat edges close to the ground.

The longer the blade, the more efficient the stroke and less overall effort. The thinner the blade, the less effort required. That is why I am not a fan of the pocket chainsaw type saws: you have to cut 5x the wood to cut the same branch!!!

Every folding saw I have used has failed sooner than later.

The reasons I never bought a Sven saw are I've heard complaints of the frame bending and breaking, they are fairly short and the design severely limits the use of the blade. The maximum diameter you can cut is twice the height of the blade to the frame. That is why most bucksaws are very tall.


I pretty much always have a knife and Griz saw on me, even just dayhiking. http://www.outdooredge.com/product-p/griz-saw.htm

Hard to beat a cheap, tough, light saw like this. Small enough to fit in most packs. http://t.harborfreight.com/21-inch-bow-saw-66545.html

When planning on processing a lot of wood, I bring a 30" bow saw blade similar to this. http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/30 ... 10%2D0762/

My favorite way to carry it is to clip it to the outside of my pack. To do this, run the heaviest split ring (1" to 1-1/2" diameter work well) you can find through the hole at each the end of the blade. Put a piece of bike inner tube over the blade to protect everything from being cut by it when not in use. I like to cut the inner tube long so it accordions a bit. This helps it to completely cover the blade and gives some extra for projects in the field. If the inner tube exposes the saw blade, cut a small hole and clip it onto the carabiners. Snap a carabiner onto the split ring at each end, then snap those to the outside of the pack, strap on a haversack, around your waist, etc. You can also roll up bow saw blades into a coil and stuff inside a cook pot, pack, etc.

To use it there are several types of frames that can be made in the field. I usually make a simple bow style frame by finding a strong springy branch or sapling 1-1/2" to 2-1/2" in diameter. Some woods work much better than others. After cutting it to length, cut a deep notch (1"-3") in each end. It is important that the notches are in line with each other when the wood is bent. Sometimes it is helpful to shave some wood off the inside as with bow making. It can be handy to use a piece of cordage with a loop on either end (that is the same length as the saw blade) when you are first learning to do this.

Now unclip the blade from the carabiners and remove the inner tube. The split rings catch the notches and prevent the branch from slipping off the blade. The spring tension of the branch holds the blade in place. Only takes a few seconds to make and works well.


This blade concept looks interesting. Supposed to be safer and bounce less, yet has aggressive teeth in the middle so you get the best of both worlds. Might give one a try someday. http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/30 ... 20%2D0760/

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Re: Sven Saw

#6

Post by Roche » Sun Sep 06, 2015 7:27 am

I've had my Sven for over 20 years and replaced the blade a few years ago. Compared to a Sawvivor (they both use the same blade) I'd go with a Sawvivor - an ouce or two lighter and the rectagular shape allows you to use the full blade more efficiently.

I'm no lumberjack but here is a tip. Saw lightly using the full length of the blade, let the blade do the work. Many people only use the middle six inches of the blade and push down too hard, jamming the blade and wearing out the blade.

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Re: Sven Saw

#7

Post by DuxDawg » Sun Sep 06, 2015 9:09 am

Excellent tip! Good to hear some Svens last a while. If you don't mind my asking, how much use does it see? I usually replace my saw blades every 3 years, and I wear them out before replacing. The Sawvivor looks like a more affordable version of the Bob Dustrude Quick Buck Saw. Very impressive design but the sticker shock sent me in the direction I mentioned in the post above.

http://www.amazon.com/Bob-Dustrude-Quic ... B00JAMO6W2

Glowing review of the Sawvivor by Trail Blazer. Must be an old article since the Sawvivor has been out of production for a while.
http://backpackingsaw.com/folding-saw/sawvivor/
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Re: Sven Saw

#8

Post by Roche » Sun Sep 06, 2015 11:43 am

I only take the Sven on group outings of 5 or more, less than 5 times a year. Expect 15+ years of blade life at that rate. As with any piece of gear it is stored dry and clean, a little WD40 to prevent rust.

The Dustrude is a stud - I've seen them in action. Just a bit of an overkill for my requirements, but I'm always glad when some other guy buys and carries one.

Yes it looks like the Sawvivor is out of production, that's a shame as it was a good product.

Tip # 2: I've always held the saw above the blade. Imagine the hurt if your hand slipped under the blade.
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Re: Sven Saw

#9

Post by Pine E. Woods » Wed Oct 28, 2015 1:43 pm

Scuba wrote:I regularly carry my 7 oz Bahco Laplander.
One of my favorites! Do I need it? Absolutely not, but it sure makes the trip more fun. Instead of feeding a bunch of trash wood into the fire, I search for a nice downed oak about 2-4" diameter and cut enough 16" pieces to make a nice mini log pile. I'll even split some by cutting half way thru and hitting it, but I'm not very good at that.

On the other hand, many times I won't even have a fire. it just depends on when and where.

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Re: Sven Saw

#10

Post by GregD » Mon Apr 11, 2016 10:11 am

DuxDawg wrote:When clearing sites of underbrush, knives and machetes leave lil pungi sticks for dogs and people to step on. Saws leave nice smooth flat edges close to the ground.
That was my experience last time out. I was looking at a small saw, but then I found this:

http://www.knifecenter.com/item/VN54875 ... n-Serrated

At about 4 oz it is bigger and heavier than what I thought I was looking for. The saw is probably best for brush smaller than the size of my finger, but that is all I expect to want to use it for.

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Re: Sven Saw

#11

Post by brutalguyracing » Wed Apr 13, 2016 3:08 pm

Sven saw ftmfw


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Re: Sven Saw

#12

Post by bodhran4me » Fri Apr 15, 2016 10:01 pm

What about something like these? https://www.youtube.com/results?search_ ... le+bucksaw

I have seen bow saws made by notching and bending a branch to accept the saw blade that is held to the branch by keyrings.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkzIrnnOG44

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Re: Sven Saw

#13

Post by GoatHanger » Sat Apr 16, 2016 8:51 am

I really like Bob's quick saw from four dog stove.

I've been fighting the urge to buy one for awhile. It would be a luxury item, since my knife takes care of most tasks. I'll get one eventually. I know this, because I have been looking at them for a couple of years.

https://youtu.be/vEdCN0lwieM
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Re: Sven Saw

#14

Post by DuxDawg » Wed May 25, 2016 10:29 am

Some carry options for bow saw blades. Becoming more of a fan of carrying a disassembled bucksaw frame, rather than improvising one. Faster, safer, works better.

https://youtu.be/GBSKnNn92mA

https://youtu.be/0bZiLoG7FXM
"Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice!" Philippians 4:4 NASB
"The things you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you." Philippians 4:9 NASB

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