Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

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Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#1

Post by BillyBob66 » Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:13 pm

Hey Guys,
The last thing I dropped to UL ( more or less ) with was my pack. I had just broke the bank a couple of years before getting serious about lowering the weight(meaning spending money if needed to get er down there) by getting a custom fit/ custom fit McHale Pack out of Seattle, WA. ( I later broke the bank some more buying fragile UL gear)

8 or 10 years ago, carrying total loads of 40-45 lbs for my week long trips to such places as the Wind River Mountains in early fall, where winter weather can and does happen even in the peak of summer(and I refuse to risk being cold, been there/done that), my back would hurt with all previous packs I had used, external or internal frame. Strangely, even my Dana Terraplane which had about the highest reviews a pack could have at the time. But I was always needing to stretch every time we stopped even for a minute, trying to ease the discomfort in my lower back. So I found this company, a cottage industry, with zero reviews (why not?) in any of the normal places, almost no adds only endless rave reviews from their customers at their web site, usually accompanied by pictures on the long trails or even Everest. Lots and lots of user reviews over 20+ years, 100% 5 star. It cost and arm and a leg or two, but I went for it.

And lo an behold, on my next trip, I had first time ever severe altitude sickness for much of the trip, but I had no more back discomfort, or any other kind related to my pack( this was also my first hammock trip so two new things being tested). This internal frame pack weighs a good 5 or 6 lbs if you have every removable option on it, including the "bayonet" extendable frame if you are packing a really tall, heavy load( but they do make 3.5 lb packs with frames) . But it is a true load monster, with an incredibly strong 7075 aluminum frame with weight tranfer to hip equal to the best external frames I have used, with no shoulder pressure at nearly 50 lbs, plus. with maybe a bit over 6000 ci. So I had to carry extra weight just from the pack itself, but for the first time in a long time I hiked in comfort. It worked to my disadvantage when one of my buddies(with an external frame!) could not find room in his pack for all of his stuff, and I ended up carrying some of his more voluminous stuff( we tried to keep the weight ~ equal, I just took his space hog stuff, giving him some of my heavier relative to volume stuff). I had plenty of room even without strapping on. And though my pack was huge- every one was afraid I would tip over- I actually had the most stable carry of anyone on that trip. ( can't find a picture of that right now)

This is with the top overload skirt extended, but without the top/fanny pocket
Image

The bottom 1/3 of the stout internal frame looking into the bottom zippered sleeping bag pocket:
Image

The upper part of the external frame(with frame extenders removed, also entire frame is removable, can be contoured/shaped to my spine:
Image


So, anyway, about UL. And I know what you are thinking: "a pack that is 3-4 lbs heavier? Heck, that alone increases my base weight by 30% or more!". And for sure, as my total skin out and loaded pack weight kept dropping from 50-75 lbs to 30 to 40 or even 20-25 in warm weather (for week long trips, even less for 1 or 2 nights especially when not so cold), I obviously did not need a 5-6 lb monster load hauler. But I was sort of slow to give that, and my sleeping bags, up. In both cases: money. Plus, for the sleeping bag vs quilts, in the first year or so I had issues where I lacked confidence in my ability to stay as warm as I could in a bag, due to drafts, and how much I valued a hood and neck collar. It took me a while to work all of that out.

But I was even slower to go to a UL pack, mainly due to volume. That first year or 2 on the other forum, it just seemed like I read about a lot about folks having a lot of trouble getting all of their insulation and food into their packs, most especially on winter trips. And the places I went, I was always a long ways from any bailout and it could be winter on any day of the year. But me, I had all the volume I could possibly need, even with synthetic bags and clothing. And maybe enough to help out some friends, or the grand kids, whatever. No compression stuff sacks ever needed.

Plus, seemed like sometimes, when the guys using these UL packs at or near their limits, like a week long trip in cold weather, when it was very hard not to approach 40+lbs, sometimes there were complaints about lack of comfort. And I was not confident I could do a week long trip the the Winds in Sept while staying below 40 lbs, even if I could do <3 day trips around here staying well below 40 lbs. So between $ and the other stuff, I was slow to step down.

Any one share any experiences like this? I'll go to my pack downsizing next post, as well as why I have been playing around with the idea of using my heavy pack some again, on my next posts:
http://www.mchalepacks.com
Last edited by BillyBob66 on Wed Aug 24, 2016 11:58 am, edited 4 times in total.


Rom8:21the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption23..but..we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit.. groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body

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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#2

Post by BillyBob66 » Sun Aug 14, 2016 9:27 pm

http://www.mchalepacks.com/ultralight/d ... Letter.htm
Off Topic
I know the toughest part of packing is just finding the time to do it. There has always been light gear and it has never been a secret that if you don't have to carry a 40, 50, or 60 lb. load you don't. If you have to carry 60 lbs there is no way to make it lighter than 60 lbs! You knew that! As a packmaker I like the challenge of making packs out of good old fashioned fabrics (that are actually quite remarkable) like 420 high tenacity - HT - pack cloth - USA made ( there are many imitations that have the tear strength of cotton! ) and making them reasonably light - after all, it's what you put in the pack that will make or break you. If a company says they use 420 denier fabric it does not mean it is a high quality version.

Anyway, you can get what you want here and I won't argue with you whether you want a 2 lb pack or a 5 lb. pack. To my way of thinking; if you put a 30 lb load in each the percentage difference is just not that significant - especially when you consider the comfort advantage. It is even less significant when you throw your body weight into the mix, which is what most formulas leave out. Yes, being overweight in the body has it's own impact, not the least of which is the negative effect it has on pack performance - hipbelt effectiveness etc. You cannot wear a hip belt high on the hips around the illiac crest or 'crest' over it if you are overweight - the bigger your belly the less you should expect from ANY brand of pack. A large belly forces the hipbelt too low and then interfere with leg stride and blood flow. It's the impact of your total body and pack weight taking each step and that 3 lbs difference in pack weights out of 200+ lbs isn't going to change things. Let's say you weigh 175 lbs with your boots and all, and your total load including your 3 lb pack weighs 32 lbs. That's 207 lbs landing on each step! Getting a 1.5 lb pack at this point will make a .73% difference - woopie! Anyway, this is just the tip of the argument iceberg. I know it sounds stupid but I like to say you are better off carrying a 30 lb. load in a 10 lb pack that works than in a 1.5 lb. pack that doesn't. This makes even more sense of course when you look at what even a 3, 4 or 5 lb pack can do. There is a lot of cult pressure to use 1.5 pound packs. There is such a thing as cult stupidity. Learn to tell by just looking at people to see if they are uncomfortable. They have always been out there and they are there with 1.5 lb. packs too. The notion that you can't be uncomfortable with a 1.5 lb. pack is just more cult stupidity. I get a kick out of looking at photos of packs on people on the internet. It is easy to see when a pack is uncomfortable without even being there - but it's all relative.

You might have to carry a 4 or 5 lb. pack and it's not as bad as some make it out to be. A 4 lb. pack is light, even if I have to say so myself. I had a 4 lb. pack on this Rainier climb. A lighter pack would have made no difference whatsoever in the outcome. Even if we went lighter, at least 2 of the people with me could not have kept up even if I went faster. The best argument for a five pound pack is the 15 lb load. So you have to carry 20 lbs when you have a 5 lb. pack instead of 16, 17, or 18. It starts to get pretty silly and you start wondering what it's all about. What!? I'll take the pack that gives me the option to carry the rocks that are in my head in the pack. People from just the last generation would think we are all a little touched I think............................................
Rom8:21the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption23..but..we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit.. groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body

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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#3

Post by BillyBob66 » Sun Aug 14, 2016 10:30 pm

Before I start with my lighter packs, let me say this: while playing around with the McHale pack lately, wondering if I can ever justify it's weight again, I had my wife pull down the top points of the frame, quite hard. With nothing in the pack that could help support the frame, as a loaded pack tends to do with frameless packs or the MMP. She did not seem to be real far from doing a pull up. Probably not that much, but a pretty good bit of weight. Essentially no bending of the frame, no shoulder pressure, and very close to 100% of the weight on my hips.

So, 2 or 3 years after switching to hammocks and steadily lowering my skin out weight ( but not counting body weight! :shock: :oops: )I finally bought a 2 lb. Golight Pinnacle and a bit later a somewhat heavier Molly MacPack, 2 lbs but more once you add however many stuff sacks, straps, buckles and maybe also a front pack!. Both have proven to be great.

The Pinnacle has proven to all that I need for weekend trips here in the south in fall weather, and I use it more often than any of the others for my day hikes, just because of the convenience of just having 1 main pocket(plus the small hip belt pockets and a smaller water proof front pocket(mesh on some). It has no frame except CCF pads, but has carried most of the lighter loads ( 20-25 lb or less) with no problems.

The MMP, though it is heavier than the Pinnacle, is still not very heavy and is very durable, every thing heavy duty. I could lower the packs total weight quite a bit by leaving off straps and buckles I don't need, or just adding light duty straps or even using nylon cords and knots, and using just the number of stuff sacks I need and no more, but I would never get below the 2 lb base . As far as having just one large sack for my day hikes, I could of course just strap on one just large enough sack, and no more. It also has no frame ( it is the oldest model ) but the strapped on stuff sacks seem to give it plenty of frame like support. Plus it has a very heavy duty(again, oldest model) front pack. I put as much weight as possible in or strapped onto that front pack: water, a pistol, my tarp, maps/GPS, etc. The more weight I put in there, with it's straps running up and over my top most stuff sack on the back, it seemed to nicely balance the weight and also prevent any weight on my shoulders. I noticed that even with somewhat heavier loads, I tended to walk standing straight up, just like I would with no pack at all But, I also tend to sweat a lot where that front pack lays on my belly. I need to use this pack a lot more than I have, to really put it to the test. I suspect it could handle most anything I ever have needed to carry.

Next, my longer trip experiences with the 2 lb, frame-less Pinnacle.
Last edited by BillyBob66 on Wed Aug 24, 2016 12:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#4

Post by BillyBob66 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:15 am

OK, so a few years ago, on my last big backpacking trip, a buddy and I and his college age son are going to the Sawtooth range of ID for about a 4 or 5 day, 1st week Sept. I ended up taking my 4000 ci Golight Pinnacle, I'm not sure why other than it saved me 3-4 lbs over the McHale, and maybe a lb or so over the MMP, plus I was not sure either of the others would work/fit as well with my Packa.

I just can not remember what weight I ended up with. I think with some last many additions, I ended up heavier than I thought I would, maybe up into the 30 lb range. The Pinnacle was not too bad with that amount, but did not carry near as good as on my trips back home. I remember kind of wishing I had the MMP. But the main thing was volume. What with my PeaPod and warm clothing, I was very maxed out. Not easy to pack, and the comfort was on the verge of poor. Like the Wind Rivers in WY, not far away to the east, even though we were 2k to 3k feet lower in elevation, it still could have been potentially very cold and wet. As it turns out, it was about 32F first night, and maybe 40 all the other nights and all dry, so not too bad really, but could have been worse. If I had been going into the Winds, at the higher elevation, I might have felt a need for a bit more insulation or food. I felt if I had needed even a lb or 2 more of either, it would have been too much, both in volume plus carrying steadily worse. Not terrible, but definitely at the limit IMO.

So, I think I would have done better with a MMP at a lb or possibly 2 heavier counting the weight of all the stuff sacks. But I'm wondering if going 3-4 lbs heavier with the McHale, especially if I had needed even a tad more food or insulation, would have also been reasonable? I would not even have needed to compress my insulation very much even if I had more of it or more food, leading to quick and easy packing. And of course, at least as pack comfort went, it would have laughed off those weights. Sometimes I wonder.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#5

Post by sarge » Mon Aug 15, 2016 8:38 am

Ohhhh noooooo-----

A custom backpack site to wander through!

I'm not going to get any work done today--------
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#6

Post by BillyBob66 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 9:39 am

sarge wrote:Ohhhh noooooo-----

A custom backpack site to wander through!

I'm not going to get any work done today--------
:lol:
Well, just be warned that it won't be cheap, may require a new mortgage! Of course, you would just see how he does it and make your own! ;)

Since he does make lighter packs, I should have just looked into one of his lighter models ( but still with a frame and adequate volume ) back when I had mine made. But the main thing on my mind at that time was being able to carry a 40+ lb load comfortably into some wild wilderness where you don't see many other folks. On rough trails or off trail or boulder hopping. Having worked so hard to get it down from 55-75 lbs, I could not comprehend getting much lighter, though I did. So that comfort with at least 40 lb loads was all that counted for me then, so I got one that could handle that with ease, and it did. But I only got about 2 years on it before my loads went well below 40. It still worked fantastic for that also, always had lots of room, but was carrying a couple of pounds more than needed I suppose.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#7

Post by sarge » Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:43 pm

I know whereof you speak. My go to pack is a Zimmerbuilt. My search for a pack that did what I thought it should do for packing a hammock led me through the Molly Mac Pack (good pack, steep learning curve, not suitable for my purposes in the end), and ended up with a 6 pound pack that had long side pockets that turned out to be my solution but-----6 pounds-----

That led me to Chris Zimmer and I haven't looked back. He puts a 35 pound weight limit on it, so its not in the same class as the Terraplane or those McHales, but I do love it. Weighs just about two pounds.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6p5X91- ... 2iBV7omqHU
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#8

Post by Scuba » Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:11 pm

I have a Zimmerbuilt hammock model in multicasm (just over 2 lbs) and I am thinking of getting a Zpacks ArcZip (about 24oz). Both those packs are meant to carry about 30lbs or less, but my base weight is usually well under 20 lbs, and sometimes as low as 12.

For heavier hauling I have a few Eberlestock packs, including a Destroyer, a Terminator, and a MainFrame. I f I need to carry 60 to 100 lbs, these packs are great for that but can weigh up to 8lbs on their own.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#9

Post by BillyBob66 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 8:56 pm

Zimmerbuilt eh? I'll have to look into that!
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#10

Post by BillyBob66 » Mon Aug 15, 2016 10:13 pm

sarge wrote:I know whereof you speak. My go to pack is a Zimmerbuilt. My search for a pack that did what I thought it should do for packing a hammock led me through the Molly Mac Pack (good pack, steep learning curve, not suitable for my purposes in the end), and ended up with a 6 pound pack that had long side pockets that turned out to be my solution but-----6 pounds-----

That led me to Chris Zimmer and I haven't looked back. He puts a 35 pound weight limit on it, so its not in the same class as the Terraplane or those McHales, but I do love it. Weighs just about two pounds.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6p5X91- ... 2iBV7omqHU
OK, great video, very interesting pack! You mention a 2100 ci main pack, but what is the total ci counting all the other hammock friendly pockets? It must be significant since it has room for your hammock, tarp and full length 30F TQ and UQ. Even though they are down, that do take up some room.

Can you link me to your winter set up using this pack, the video that you mentioned? I gave my example from above, where hiking into the Sawtooth of ID Mtns with elevations averaging maybe 8000 ft, with average lows of 28F but quite possibly in the teens or even lower(my personal lows- same time of year 1st week Sept- over in the Wind Rivers not way far east but maybe averaging 2000 ft higher: 15F once, with numerous 20Fs, even a 24F on a June 27) And of course, could be very wet and windy at the same time. With double layer, narrow, 10 ft Claytor hammock, warm clothing, a 927FP 20F PeaPod(some extra volume there compared to separate quilts but not a lot), 11X10 JRB rectangular tarp(gotta block that wind and wind blown rain/snow), 1/2 WM Blue pad( I always take some sort of pad for emergency hammock warmth or go to ground, sit pad, fire fan, etc), stove, fuel, food etc etc for 5 days with no bail out other than a 1 or 2 day hike back to the trail head. So, my 4000 ci Pinnacle was very much maxed out. One more day or slightly colder temps( say a week or two later in the fall) and I could not have done it, not without figuring out how to strap on the outside. I might could have saved a little volume by going with one of my torso UQs + a TQ, but I'm not sure how much.

So I'm interested in how you think this pack will do with such a trip. IMO, the supposed 2100 ci would not be possible for me, I was actually wishing for a bit over 4000, but it clearly that pack has some more ci available. Of course, I'm sure this guy could build a a larger pack, capable of carrying much more volume and weight, and still be a darn light pack. I'm going to have a look at his stuff. I especially like that "hammock pack" concept you came up with.
Last edited by BillyBob66 on Wed Aug 24, 2016 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#11

Post by sarge » Mon Aug 15, 2016 11:04 pm

IIRC, its about another 1200 ci more for the hammock and quilt pockets, and +/- 580 for the mesh tarp pocket. The whole concept was to just remove the sleep system from the main cargo area, and I don't think the side hammock pocket is good for much else as its long and narrow and getting to items in the bottom would be a drudgery. Same for the back pocket but there's a bit more room there---unless you're packing for the temps you're talking about, then putting anything but quilts in there would be a real tight squeeze. I can pack my 30 degree system---which is (4) Costco quilts---in that back pocket with a bit of room for my leg warmers and a small down pillow.

I'm nor sure if it would suit the demands you're outlining, there's certainly no way to pack a pad unless you have him add some strap loops at the bottom. There's no top flap---the top closes like a water proof stuff sack roll and snap, and there's one strap to cinch it down. I've stuffed a jacket under there, but cinched it up tight and looked behind me anytime I brushed a branch on the trail. Its more of a "backpacker" backpack than a "trekker" or mountaineering pack. I did design it with the thought of doing an unsupported thru of the Lone Star Trail---about 4-5 days on flat terrain---in February, but that's usually only a 30 degree trip.

Chris was pretty adamant about the 35# max capacity. He got a bit concerned when I showed him the mountaineering pack that gave me the idea for the side pockets and wanted to make sure I understood that was all it was going to handle. I don't know if he's geared to do something more robust, or is even inclined to do so.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#12

Post by BillyBob66 » Tue Aug 16, 2016 12:44 am

sarge wrote:IIRC, its about another 1200 ci more for the hammock and quilt pockets, and +/- 580 for the mesh tarp pocket. The whole concept was to just remove the sleep system from the main cargo area, and I don't think the side hammock pocket is good for much else as its long and narrow and getting to items in the bottom would be a drudgery. Same for the back pocket but there's a bit more room there---unless you're packing for the temps you're talking about, then putting anything but quilts in there would be a real tight squeeze. I can pack my 30 degree system---which is (4) Costco quilts---in that back pocket with a bit of room for my leg warmers and a small down pillow.

I'm nor sure if it would suit the demands you're outlining, there's certainly no way to pack a pad unless you have him add some strap loops at the bottom. There's no top flap---the top closes like a water proof stuff sack roll and snap, and there's one strap to cinch it down. I've stuffed a jacket under there, but cinched it up tight and looked behind me anytime I brushed a branch on the trail. Its more of a "backpacker" backpack than a "trekker" or mountaineering pack. I did design it with the thought of doing an unsupported thru of the Lone Star Trail---about 4-5 days on flat terrain---in February, but that's usually only a 30 degree trip.

Chris was pretty adamant about the 35# max capacity. He got a bit concerned when I showed him the mountaineering pack that gave me the idea for the side pockets and wanted to make sure I understood that was all it was going to handle. I don't know if he's geared to do something more robust, or is even inclined to do so.
OK, thx, that's a good point that he might not be geared for, or experienced in either I suppose, or even inclined, to make larger packs. It might be better just to get some one like McHale to make a smaller pack- which he does- weighing 3 or 3.5 lbs or so but still with an excellent frame that would easily handle 40+ lbs and 4000+ ci, or about 4000 with plenty of strap on capabilities. Or it might be a better idea except for the cost. His packs are superb and very durable, but dang they are expensive.

It sounds like you are hitting about 3800 to 3900 ci, not far from my Pinnacle, which makes sense as they are both just a tad over 2 lbs. I agree that I would not make it on my typical high Rockies fall trip, not unless I managed to decrease volume by at least a bit more. I had a synthetic jacket and pants that I could replace with down, and that would compress a bit more, but I'm not sure I would want to do that. I feel a little safer in Polarguard/Primaloft/Climashield clothing for hiking in bad weather, than with down, call me old fashioned and crazy. I could get treated down maybe, but again mucho $. Sometimes I start wondering about diminishing returns.

And, I'm wondering if McHale doesn't have a point. Especially considering body weight. With a 15 lb load including UL pack, using a 5 lb pack raises the total skin out load to 18 lb. And increases the total load of a 200 pounder from 215 to 218. 18 lbs is still so light for me I'm not sure I would notice the difference. My day hiking loads, where I often throw in multiple hammocks just to compare some out in the woods, might run 15 or 18 lbs and I never notice them either way. 15 up to 18 is a 20% weight increase, I'm just not sure how noticeable 20% of 15 lb is. But for the 200 pounder, counting the weight on each foot step and the total load that must be hauled up hill, it is a 1.39% increase. With a 200 lb'er and a 30 lb load, moving up 3 lb is 1.30%, and a 40 lb load, the 3 lb heavier pack is a 1.25% increase(or a 1.6% increase with a pack 4 lbs heavier).

But the thing is, for that 1.25-1.6% total weight increase, benefits are obtained. If the load starts approaching 30-40 lb or more, the heavier pack will probably be much more comfortable on my back and shoulders, have much more room for insulation that won't even need to be compressed very much. Plus, if a little more needs to be added- food or insulation- for peace of mind, no problem either for room or handling the load.

So, though I had not thought it out to that degree, I can see why downsizing my pack was the last thing to happen for me. Depending on the load, of course, the pros vs cons of the smaller, lighter pack seems debatable. The the smaller and lighter the load, the more sense it makes. But if I find myself on one of those same type trips again, I might just move up in weight at least to the MMP or maybe even to the McHale. Or not. ;)
Last edited by BillyBob66 on Tue Aug 16, 2016 9:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Rom8:21the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption23..but..we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit.. groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body

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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#13

Post by Idaho Hanger » Tue Aug 16, 2016 2:29 pm

Pack comfort trumps all other considerations, in my opinion.
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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#14

Post by Mophead » Tue Aug 16, 2016 4:34 pm

Idaho Hanger wrote:Pack comfort trumps all other considerations, in my opinion.
Mostly agree with this. I am 6'4" and a for many commercial packs, if the are not too short, are right at my limit for comfort. it becomes really important how I pack my items and how I adjust straps. If I had the money I would probably order a custom length ohm2. I have liked mine so far after getting it broken in.

When I started out I had a cavernous 85L McKinley. Not McKinley the brand, but the model. It was some obscure company that probably sold a run of packs and then disappeared. It was a nice enough pack, bombproof; but was at least 6lbs empty.

After that I got an osprey exos. I was really close to going up to the atmos which was heavier, but fit my torso better.

Somewhere I have some pics of a Yukon style pack I made for a multi day bow hunting trip. I lashed the super padded hip belt from the McKinley 85 onto the frame of my climbing tree stand. Then rolled up my tarp with hammock and other gear and lashed it onto the other side of the climber. I think my base weight was mid 30s which I was pretty happy with considering my stand alone was 12 lbs. and it was shoulder season gear.

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Re: Let's talk pack weights, like 2lb or < vs >3-4lb or more!

#15

Post by BillyBob66 » Tue Aug 16, 2016 9:05 pm

Mophead wrote:
Idaho Hanger wrote:Pack comfort trumps all other considerations, in my opinion.
Mostly agree with this. I am 6'4" and a for many commercial packs, if the are not too short, are right at my limit for comfort. it becomes really important how I pack my items and how I adjust straps. If I had the money I would probably order a custom length ohm2. I have liked mine so far after getting it broken in.

When I started out I had a cavernous 85L McKinley. Not McKinley the brand, but the model. It was some obscure company that probably sold a run of packs and then disappeared. It was a nice enough pack, bombproof; but was at least 6lbs empty.

After that I got an osprey exos. I was really close to going up to the atmos which was heavier, but fit my torso better.

Somewhere I have some pics of a Yukon style pack I made for a multi day bow hunting trip. I lashed the super padded hip belt from the McKinley 85 onto the frame of my climbing tree stand. Then rolled up my tarp with hammock and other gear and lashed it onto the other side of the climber. I think my base weight was mid 30s which I was pretty happy with considering my stand alone was 12 lbs. and it was shoulder season gear.
So then you had a 12 lb pack frame more or less! Cool! Wow, and I thought my McHale's frame was stout! Now it seems positively wimpy! ;)
Rom8:21the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption23..but..we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit.. groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body

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